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Brentwood dad creates app to prevent child deaths

Brentwood dad creates app to prevent child deaths

A Brentwood father of three recently created a smart phone app that helps prevent children from being left in cars, which can lead to potentially fatal situations.

A Brentwood father of three recently created a smart phone app that helps prevent children from being left in cars, which can lead to potentially fatal situations.

The app, “Remember the Kids,” works both in the phone’s foreground and background, and detects when a driver is moving above 20 mph. When the app determines a driver has stopped for more than three minutes, an alert is sent to the phone, which reads, “Did you remember the kids?”

Cody King, a Brentwood resident and IT professional, said the app launched this week and already has recorded a couple hundred downloads. The app is available on the iTunes store for $1.99.

King said he had the idea about a year and a half ago while he was driving to work.

“It completely dawned on me that I could be distracted and forget my kids were in the car,” King said. “I realized I wasn’t above it. I was haunted by it.”

According to the Department of Earth & Climate Sciences at San Francisco State University, there have been 13 deaths to date as a result of a child being left in a car. On average, 35 to 45 children die each year after being trapped inside a motor vehicle. Just Monday an Antioch man was arrested after leaving his two-year-old daughter in a locked car while he spent 20 minutes in a Nolensville Pike market.

“We get calls routinely from parents who accidentally lock their kids in their car and need the door opened [but] usually not for more than a couple of minutes,” Brentwood Fire & Rescue Chief Brian Goss said. “We have become such a distracted society that I guess it’s inevitable.”

Brentwood Asst. Police Chief Tommy Walsh said there has never been a death attributed to a child locked in a vehicle in Brentwood, but the department has investigated incidents of this nature where the child was not seriously injured.

King said children can suffer from heatstroke in cars even with temperatures as low as 57 degrees. Because a child’s body heat rises three to five times faster than an adult, it could take less than 10 minutes for a car to reach dangerous levels where a child’s organs start to shut down.

The app is currently only available for iPhone, but King said his team is working on software for other models.

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