Bishop Gunn searches for play at Pilgrimage Festival


Bishop Gunn searches for play at Pilgrimage Festival

By EMILY R. WEST

After starting the tour season on the Gold Record Road in Franklin, Travis McCready and his band, Bishop Gunn, hopes it brings them back right where they started this summer.

After starting the tour season on the Gold Record Road in Franklin, Travis McCready and his band, Bishop Gunn, hopes it brings them back right where they started this summer.

Strumming out the notes to the name of his tour — “Let the People Know” — McCready played for a Monday night crowd at Kimbro’s Cafe, most of which started out as acoustic set with just McCready on stage. For the rest of the night, the band hopped after the show and played the rest of the night unplugged.

“The concert went really good,” he said. “I would say the crowd looked enthusiastic and looked pleased. That’s always a good connection. Franklin’s awesome.”

His song and the American Music Triangle have blended together and share a similar mission. AMT stretches across more than 30 communities. The route runs along the Natchez Trace, down Interstate 10, Highway 61, and Interstate 40.

“We wrote that song right before we got involved with the Triangle,” he said. “They explained what they were doing, and we had this song explaining what we’ve been writing about it and wanted to enforce this.”

Franklin is a stop along the preservation project way, along 1,500 miles of highway that will encompass nine different genres of music. AMT is a grassroots movement for tourism and allows for an online community to engage in its history.

McCready wants to tour the five states that create the triangle, and want artists to bring music to his town of Natchez, Miss., in order to trade off work.

The musician and his group use vintage gear and record in what McCready considers “old fashioned” ways. Bishop Gunn doesn’t use electronic imitation and wants to restore the way to do more authentic music.

His favorite instrument is a 1949 Gibson southern jumbo guitar played with musical influences spanning the 1970s-1990s. Artists from Led Zepplin and the Allman Brothers category rank high with McCready’s group, with Muddy Waters and older blues artists also providing ideas for technique.

McCready hopes to reconnect with that audience in September. Deliberations are in the works with the Pilgrimage Music and Culture Festival, and McCready could potentially play a show for the Park at Harlinsdale Farm crowd.

“We did a private showcase for a couple of people over it,” he said. “They are trying to fit us in and making a decision about it now. They are trying to see where to put us in. We are hoping that they let us play.”

Emily West covers Franklin for Home Page Media Group. Contact her at emily@franklinhomepage.com. Follow her on Twitter via @emwest22.

About The Author

Kelly Gilfillan is the owner-publisher of Home Page Media Group which has been publishing hyperlocal news since 2009.

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