Local man promoted to CEO of transitional housing program


Local man promoted to CEO of transitional housing program

Williamson County Chamber of Commerce member Gerald Brown was recently selected as the CEO of Dismas, Inc., a non-profit transitional housing program.

Williamson County Chamber of Commerce member Gerald Brown was recently selected as the CEO of Dismas, Inc., a non-profit transitional housing program.

Dismas provides a temporary home and support services for men and women returning to mainstream society from prisons and jails. The Dismas House of Nashville has served more than 1,000 former offenders.

Brown was selected because of his more than 10 years of experience in non-profit, development and financial management. He will lead the organization’s strategic planning and oversee all fundraising and marketing initiatives.

Prior to his new position, Brown served as executive director of development for the Nashville Salvation Army, managing a budget of $7 million dollars. Before that, he spent nine years as the chief development officers for the Boy Scouts of America Middle Tennessee Council, generating revenue to fund all programs within 37 counties.

“We’re thrilled to welcome Gerald to the Dismas family,” Dismas, Inc. President Patrick Theobold said in a press release. “His combination of non-profit leadership and depth of development expertise will propel the organization to the next level of growth.”

Brown earned his bachelor’s degree in management and marketing from Middle Tennessee State University, where he also played collegiate football. He is an active member of several civic organizations, including the Williamson County Chamber of Commerce, the Lebanon and Hermitage Rotary Clubs, Young Nonprofit Professionals and currently serves as president-elect for Middle Tennessee Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.

“I am truly honored to serve the Middle Tennessee community as CEO of Dismas, Inc.,” Brown said in the release. “I hope to galvanize the community, enrich the lives of our residents and raise awareness about the work Dismas does in the community.”

Since 2012, 19 percent of former offenders who completed the Dismas program have returned to prison. Nationally, almost 70 percent of former inmates are rearrested within three years and 50 percent return to prison.

Dismas is a temporary home providing not only room and board but also life skills mentoring, mental health assessments, counseling and educational programming.

For more information, visit www.dismas.org.

About The Author

Kelly Gilfillan is the owner-publisher of Home Page Media Group which has been publishing hyperlocal news since 2009.

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